Core Courses

CM711: Essentials of Animal Experimentation
CM712: Pathophysiology of Lab Animals I
CM713: Patholophysiology of Lab Animals II
Comparative Pathology Slide Conference
Laboratory Animal Resource Management
BIOE 811, Biostatistics for the Health Sciences (optional, 3 hour credit)
IP 801, Integrity in the Conduct of Scientific Research
MSCI 929, Techniques in Molecular Biology (optional, 4 hour credit, audit) 

CM711: Essentials of Animal Experimentation

This is a graduate level introductory course on the care and use of research animals. It covers the Federal Laws and Regulatory Policies, Alternatives, Genetics and Nomenclature, Environmental Factors in the Facility, IACUC-Protocol Preparation and Review, Lab Animal Diseases, Pain and Distress, Animal Models, Statistical Design, Principles of Surgery, Health Surveillance. This Course is taught in weekly 1 hour lectures and a 3-hour lab. This course meets for 18 weeks for 48 contact hours. During the laboratory exercise the students become familiar with basic husbandry and handling, restraint, drug administration, and other experimental techniques used in a research setting. During the course two examinations are given (a Mid-term and Final) and the students are required to complete an IACUC protocol.

This course is taught every Fall Semester. New residents are enrolled in this course while returning residents assist in teaching the laboratories. Dr. David Hamilton is the course director. Others that participate in teaching are Dr. Jeff Steketee, IACUC Chair, Drs. Sullivan and Aycock and second and third year residents in the program.

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CM712: Pathophysiology of Lab Animals I

This is a graduate level course covering the biology, anatomy, husbandry and diseases in the laboratory animals. This course covers Mouse Anatomy, Biology and Husbandry, Rat Anatomy, Biology and Husbandry, Mouse Genetics, Transgenic Mice, Rodent Strains and Models, Mouse and Rat Viral Infections, Mouse and Rat Bacterial, Parasitic, Fungal, Mycoplasma and Miscellaneous Diseases, Rodent Pathology, Rabbit Diseases, Quality Control for Rodents, Rodent and Rabbit Experimental Techniques including Anesthesia and Surgery. This is a much more intense course in terms of breadth and depth of each of the topics that are presented.

This course is designed to discuss the range of material that will be covered on the ACLAM exam. This course meets weekly for 2 hours for 23 weeks – 46 contact hours. The course director is Dr. David Hamilton. Other instructors include Dr. Ryan Sullivan and Dr. Tyler Aycock (UTHSC), Dr. Tiffani Rogers (SJCRH), Dr. Jerald Rehg (SJCRH), and Dr. Amy Funk (SJCRH).

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CM713: Patholophysiology of Lab Animals II

This is a graduate level course focusing on the Anatomy, Biology and Diseases of Non-Human Primates, Swine, Small Ruminants, Miscellaneous Rodents, Ferrets, Amphibians, Fish and Reptiles and Dogs and Cats.

This course meets for 2 hours weekly for 23 weeks – 46 contact hours. The course director is Dr. David Hamilton. Other instructors include Drs. Ryan Sullivan and Tyler Aycock (UTHSC) and Drs. Tiffani Rogers, Jerald Rehg and Amy Funk (SJCRH).

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Comparative Pathology Slide Conference

This is a non-credit, but required weekly conference lead by Dr. Jerald Rehg, DCLAM, DACVP who is an Adjunct Professor in DCM as well as a full-time pathologist at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The pathology rounds cover current cases as well as cases from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology files. Theses rounds meet weekly for 40 weeks for 1.5 hour sessions- 60 contact hours. Students study the cases in advance and the cases are discussed in detail during the conference. Students are evaluated on their ability to determine the morphology and etiology of each histology slide as well as their discussion of the pathophysiology of each condition.
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Laboratory Animal Resource Management

This informal course is coordinated by Dr. Hamilton and the DCM faculty. This course focuses on facility operations and special topics in laboratory animal medicine and science. Many lectures are done by vendor representatives or technical experts external to the department.

Topics discussed include animal facility equipment (i.e. cage wash equipment, autoclaves, caging systems), animal facility operating supplies (feed, bedding, sanitation, PPE, etc.) major mechanical systems that support animal facilities (HVAC, automated watering, environmental monitoring), animal facility operations and maintenance, and facility design.

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BIOE 811, Biostatistics for the Health Sciences (optional, 3 hour credit)

The first semester material includes descriptive statistics, estimation, and one and two sample hypothesis testing, including paired and unpaired situations. Instruction includes assisting the student attain mastery-level skill in data entry and use of SAS software system for statistical analysis of data.
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IP 801, Integrity in the Conduct of Scientific Research (1 hour credit)

This course consists of a study of the ethical principles and related federal and state laws governing scientific research conducted in both public and private settings. Through a combination of lecture and case study discussion, students learn both the substance and application to scientific research of ethical principles and relevant laws.

Topics addressed include research with human subjects, research with animal subjects, the use of human biological materials, privacy and confidentiality of research and medical records, conflicts of interest, policies and procedures for addressing scientific misconduct, ownership of research, responsible reporting of research, and ethical training practices.

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MSCI 929, Techniques in Molecular Biology (optional, 4 hour credit, audit)

The theory and practical application of commonly used laboratory techniques in molecular biology are considered.
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Department of
Comparative Medicine

956 Court Avenue
Box 17, Room B106
Memphis, TN 38163
Phone: 901-448-5656
Fax: 901-448-8506