Graduate Courses and Descriptions


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COURSES IN PHARMACEUTICS

PHAC 620, Principles of Quality Control and Regulatory Factors. Quality Control and Regulatory Factors as they relate to industrial pharmacy will be covered in detail. The course begins with a Regulatory overview and the effect regulations have on pharmaceutical operations. All areas of Quality Control are addressed, including CGMPs, procedures, analysis, inspection, facilities, complaints, stability, and microbiology. In addition, the student will actually experience how these areas blend together through lecture tours. Automation, process control, statistics, and documentation will be demonstrated through actual working models. Credit 2 (2-0).

PHAC 800, Master's Thesis and Research. Research performed under the direction and supervision of the respective student's advisor. Credit and hours to be arranged.

PHAC 810, Research Techniques in Pharmaceutics. An introductory course designed to acquaint the beginner with the principal research techniques and procedures in the physical, chemical and biological evaluation of therapeutic agents. Content is tailored to the specific needs of students majoring in this field. Credit and hours to be arranged. Credit 1-3.

PHAC 812, Research Techniques in Pharmaceutics. Continuation of 810. Credit 1-3.

PHAC 813, Advanced Pharmacokinetics (Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics & Drug Development). Advanced analysis and modeling techniques in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics relevant to preclinical and clinical drug development. Includes didactic lectures and practical analysis and interpretation of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic data. Prerequisites: One year of calculus (or equivalent), and PHSC 211 and PHSC 221, or PHSC 212, or instructor permission. Spring semester in alternate years. Credit 4 (4-0).

PHAC 814, Parenteral Medications. Didactic instruction and laboratory exercises in the use of techniques in the management of problems associated with the preparation, production and distribution of medicinal agents in parenteral dosage forms. Credit 4 (2-4).

PHAC 816, Physical-Chemical Interpretation of Drug Systems. An introduction to physicochemical principles encountered in pharmaceutical systems. Ionic equilibria, and the study and quantitation of complex formation will be emphasized. Laboratory exercises will illustrate the use of concepts and calculations presented in the didactic part of the course. Credit 2 (2-0).

PHAC 817, Drug Metabolism. Fundamental principles underlying human drug metabolism and the major drug metabolizing enzymes will be reviewed. One-third of the course will cover kinetic models, factors regulating drug metabolism, and methods for studying human enzymes. Two-thirds of the course will cover the biochemistry, substrate specificity, tests of phenotype and/or genotype in vitro & in vivo, population distribution, regulation, tissue distribution, and clinical and biologic significance for the P450s and several other important phase I and phase II enzymes. The overall goal is to provide students with an understanding of the diversity and specificity of human drug metabolizing enzymes and the consequences of human variation in those enzymes to pharmacologic variability, providing a basic background so that the student can evaluate the metabolism of new and existing drugs. Prerequisites: Pharmacokinetics (Pharmaceutical Sciences 221 or equivalent), Biochemistry (one semester), Techniques in Molecular Biology (MICR 928); may substitute reading and understanding chapters 1-6 and 16 Molecular Biotechnology (Glick and Pasternak, ASM Press, 1994) or a similar text that covers basics of transcription, translation, recombinant DNA technology (cloning, DNA sequencing, PCR, RFLP, and heterologous expression of proteins), monoclonal antibodies and protein detection. Fall semester alternate years. Credit 3 (3-0).

PHAC 818, Physical, Chemical Interpretation of Poly-phasic and Disperse Drug Systems. This course covers the physicochemical principles basic to the study and evaluation of pharmaceutical disperse systems. Studies are directed at a consideration of the impact of surface effects on the design of dosage forms. Included in the study are rheology, colloidal systems, adsorption, and surface and interfacial phenomena. Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry. Credit 3 (3-0).

PHAC 819, Seminars in Pharmaceutics. Seminar presentation required of M.S. student candidates. A total of 2 credits required. Credit hours: 1(1-0).

PHAC 820, Physical- Chemistry Interpretation of Solid Drug System. This course will present physicochemical principles as they relate to solid dosage form development. The material will be presented in three sections, namely characterization of particles and powders, diffusion and dissolution of solid systems and drug product design. The overall objective of the course is to provide sufficient basic information on the concepts and principles relative to solids to provide a rational approach to solid dosage form design. Credit 3 (2-3).

PHAC 824, Principles of Formulation. A major emphasis in this course will be the application of theory and use of basic physicochemical principles in the development of dosage forms. The course will provide a basic understanding of the design and evaluation of dosage forms and the use of basic principles in the development process. It will include the following subject areas: External considerations, technical considerations, tablets, capsules, liquids, sustained release systems, novel delivery systems, pilot plant scale up. Credit 3 (2-4).

PHAC 830, Drug Delivery Systems. An introduction to the principles of formulation, development and evaluation of controlled-release drug delivery systems. Specific topics will include oral, transdermal and injectable or implantable drug delivery systems. Fall semester every other year Minimum of four students. Credit 2 (2-0).

PHAC 900, Doctoral Dissertation and Research. Research performed under the direction and supervision of the respective student's advisor. Credit to be arranged.

PHAC 911, Delivery and Biocompatibility of Protein and Nucleic Acid Drugs. This course is designed to teach students about the delivery and biocompatibility of proteins, peptides and nucleic acid drugs and dosage form design. Topics will include: (i) design, synthesis and characterization of polymer systems, (ii) biocompatibility, (iii) protein and peptide drug delivery, (iv) nucleic acid drug delivery, and (v) antisense and nonviral gene therapy.

PHAC 827, Pharmacokinetics & Dose Optimization. A graduate level introduction to the concepts and techniques involved in quantitative processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of drugs. The course will rigorously develop basic pharmacokinetic concepts based on appropriate model systems and will introduce the student to pharmacometric analysis approaches. It will furthermore introduce to the mechanistic basis of between-subject variability in pharmacokinetics and approaches to use this information for dose selection in drug development and applied pharmacotherapy. Credit: 4

PHAC 919, Seminar. Seminar presentation required of Ph.D. student candidates. A total of 3 credits required. Credit 1 (1-0).

COURSES IN MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY

MEDC 612, Organic Medicinal Chemistry I. In addition to lectures attended jointly with professional students (Medicinal Chemistry 112, 122); advanced concepts are discussed in conference sessions, limited to graduate students. Prerequisite: Two semesters of organic chemistry or equivalent. Credit 4 (3-2).

MEDC 622, Organic Medicinal Chemistry II. Continuation of Medicinal Chemistry 1. Credit 4 (3-2).

MEDC 800, Master's Thesis and Research. Research performed under the direction and supervision of the respective student's advisor, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science. Credit by arrangement.

MEDC 812, Advanced Medicinal Chemistry. This course will present concepts in medicinal chemistry with emphasis on application of these concepts to rational drug design. Classical and contemporary approaches to the design of small molecules for interaction with macromolecular targets such as receptors, enzymes, and DNA will be discussed. Spring semester on alternate years. Credit hours: 3(3-0).

MEDC 813, Research Techniques in Medicinal Chemistry. An introduction to current trends in the design and synthesis of potential medicinal agents. The course includes recent techniques applicable to the isolation and characterization of organic compounds, as well as contemporary methodology for the study and chemical and physical properties influencing biological response. The course content is tailored to the specific needs of students majoring in this field. Credit 3 (1-6).

MEDC 814, Computer-Aided Molecular Design in the Development of Chemotherapeutic Agents. The is designed to teach students the essential elements of computer-aided drug design.It will cover: 1) molecular models of small molecules, proteins, and nucleic acids and the validity of models created via computational methods; 2) determination of pharmacophore models of classes of chemotherapeutic agents and/or lead drug compounds; 3) use of protein and nucleic acid models in the development of lead drug agents; and 4) development of lead compounds or second generation drugs utilizing computational methodologies. Credit 3 (1-6).

MEDC 819, Seminar in Medicinal Chemistry I. Participation in the presentation and exhaustive discussion of topics directly or indirectly pertinent to medicinal chemistry. Credit 1 (1-0) each semester for two semesters.

MEDC 823, Research Techniques in Medicinal Chemistry II. Continuation of Medicinal Chemistry 813. Credit 3 (1-6).

MEDC 824, Computer-Aided Molecular Design in the Development of Chemotherapeutic Agents II. The course is designed for students to learn the fundamental principles of computer-aided quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses and their application to drug design and discovery. It will cover: i) the use of contemporary QSAR methodology in drug design including deriving models for prediction biological activity, ii) the use of QSAR and docking methods to explore drug binding modes at receptor sites, and iii) the strengths and pitfalls of various QSAR approaches. Students will be guided to establish predictive QSAR models using their own research data or literature data sets, and various QSAR software. Credit 3 (1-6).

MEDC 891, Combinatorial Chemistry and Molecular Diversity in Drug Discovery. This course is designed to teach students the essential elements of combinatorial chemistry and molecular diversity in drug discovery. It will cover (1) combinatorial and parallel synthesis techniques and instrumentation, (2) solid and solution phase library synthesis, (3) molecular diversity, (4) computational aspects of combinatorial chemical drug design, and (5) high throughput screening of combinatorial libraries. Credit 3 (3-0).

MEDC 900, Doctoral Dissertation and Research. Research performed under the direction and supervision of the respective student's advisor, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Credit by arrangement.

MEDC 919, Seminars in Medicinal Chemistry II. Participation in the presentation and exhaustive discussion of topics directly or indirectly pertinent to medicinal chemistry. Credit 1 (1-0) each semester for three semesters.

Contact Us

College of Pharmacy -
Memphis

881 Madison Avenue
Memphis, TN 38163
Phone: (901) 448-6036
Fax: (901) 448-7053

College of Pharmacy - Knoxville

1924 Alcoa Highway
Knoxville, TN 37920
Phone: (865) 974-2100
Fax: (865) 974-2022

College of Pharmacy - Nashville

193 Polk Ave Suite 2D
Nashville, TN 37210
Phone: (615) 532-3401
Fax: (615) 532-3399

ELECTIVES

One or more of the following courses may be taken as an elective depending on the student's area of concentration.

  • Principles of Drug Action I (PHAR 812), Credit 5 (5-0)
  • Pharmaceutical Analysis (PHAC 826), Credit 3(3-0)
  • Advanced Pharmacokinetics (PHAC 813), Credit 4(4-0)
  • Techniques in Molecular Biology (MICR 928), Credit 4(4-0)
  • Proteins and Enzymes (BIOC 926), Credit 3(3-0)
  • Principles of Mass Spectrometry (BIOC 928), Credit 2(2-0)
  • Drug Metabolism (PHAC 817), Credit 3(3-0)
  • Essentials of Animal Experimentation (CMED 711), Credit 2(2-1)
  • Fourier Transform NMR (CHEM 8301, Univ. of Memphis), Credit 3(3-0)
  • Molecular Biology, (MICR 831), Credit 5(5-0)
  • Proteins, Energy and Metabolism (BIOC 811), Credit 5(5-0)
  • Biostatistics I (BIOE 711), Credit 3(3-0)
  • Biostatistics II (BIOE 721), Credit 3(3-0)
  • Essentials of Animal Experimentation (CMED 711), Credit 2(2-0)
  • Organic Medicinal Chemistry I (MEDC612), Credit 4(4-0)
  • Organic Medicinal Chemistry II (MEDC 622), Credit 4(4-0)
  • Research Techniques in Medicinal Chemistry (MEDC 813), Credit 3(3-0)