Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities


  • Girls becoming Empowered and Mentored for Success - GEMS is part of the Relative Caregiver program.

    Girls becoming Empowered and Mentored for Success - GEMS is part of the Relative Caregiver program.

  • BCDD Receives Walmart Foundation Grant to Expand Nutrition Efforts for People with Disabilities in Four States

    BCDD Receives Walmart Foundation Grant to Expand Nutrition Efforts for People with Disabilities in Four States

  • 2017 MidSouth Autism Conference

    2017 MidSouth Autism Conference

  • Members from the Tennessee Disability community met in Washington, DC to attend the 2016 Disability Policy Seminar April 11-13, 2016.

    Members from the Tennessee Disability community met in Washington, DC to attend the 2016 Disability Policy Seminar April 11-13, 2016.

  • 2016 Audiology LEND Trainees, Caitlin Nelms and Calli Dugas named the Outstanding Students of the Year in the School Of Communication Disorders at the U of M.

    2016 Audiology LEND Trainees, Caitlin Nelms and Calli Dugas named the Outstanding Students of the Year in the School Of Communication Disorders at the U of M.

  • Dr. Toni Whitaker from the UT BCDD was named along with 29 other new Act Early Ambassadors have been selected for the CDC's national "Learn the Signs. Act Early."

    Dr. Toni Whitaker from the UT BCDD was named along with 29 other new Act Early Ambassadors have been selected for the CDC's national "Learn the Signs. Act Early."

  • Each year, the Boling Center trains over 200 masters and doctoral level students in 11 different disciplines.

    Each year, the Boling Center trains over 200 masters and doctoral level students in 11 different disciplines.

  • UT Center of Excellence for Children in State Custody has been awarded a $1.6 million dollar grant  to increase trauma-informed services to children in foster care or in military families.

    UT Center of Excellence for Children in State Custody has been awarded a $1.6 million dollar grant to increase trauma-informed services to children in foster care or in military families.

  • Speech-Language trainees, Marie Kyle and Justine Steele pose with Speech-Language pathologists, Karen Hudson and Denice Perkins after noon presentation

    Speech-Language trainees, Marie Kyle and Justine Steele pose with Speech-Language pathologists, Karen Hudson and Denice Perkins after noon presentation

  • Family Trainee, Iseashia Thomas attended the 2016 Partners in Policymaking. PIP trains families and self-advocates annually in public policy and disability rights.

    Family Trainee, Iseashia Thomas attended the 2016 Partners in Policymaking. PIP trains families and self-advocates annually in public policy and disability rights.

  • ABLETN launches June 13, 2016. ABLE TN will encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities by offering tax-advantaged investment plans for disabled individuals to pay for expenses including, but not limited to: education, housing, transportation, employment training and support, assistive technology, personal support services, and funeral and burial expenses. Learn more at http://www.abletn.gov

    ABLETN launches June 13, 2016. ABLE TN will encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities by offering tax-advantaged investment plans for disabled individuals to pay for expenses including, but not limited to: education, housing, transportation, employment training and support, assistive technology, personal support services, and funeral and burial expenses. Learn more at http://www.abletn.gov

The Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities (BCDD) is an interdisciplinary program that supports children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families through training, service, applied research, information dissemination, planning, and policy development.

Quicklinks

From Workshop to Workforce: Tennessee's Model for Reform

Home and community-based services (HCBS) provide opportunities for individuals with disabilities and older adults to receive services in their own home or community. On January 16, 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services published a final rule that sets forth new requirements for states using Medicaid funds to pay for HCBS, supports enhanced quality in HCBS programs, and adds protections for individuals receiving these services. In addition, the rule reflects the intent of CMS to ensure that individuals receiving services and supports through Medicaid's HCBS programs have full access to the benefits of community living and are able to receive services in the most integrated setting. The Administration for Community Living (ACL) is highlighting an example of a promising practice for employment benefits designed to meet the needs of individuals, promote integrated employment, and comply with requirements of the HCBS settings rule and the Supreme Court's Olmstead v. L.C. ruling. With regard to Medicaid-funded employment services it is the state's responsibility to ensure that 1915(c) HCBS supported employment waiver services are furnished to a waiver participant to the extent that they are not available as vocational rehabilitation services funded under section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Read about how Tennessee is serving as a model of reform at http://acl.gov/NewsRoom/blog/2016/2016_07_28.aspx

Achieving A Better Life Experience (ABLE Act) Begins June 13, 2016

ABLE TN will encourage and assist individuals and families to save private funds to support individuals with disabilities by offering tax-advantaged investment plans for disabled individuals to pay for expenses including, but not limited to: education, housing, transportation, employment training and support, assistive technology, personal support services, and funeral and burial expenses. The private funds saved through ABLE TN will supplement benefits provided through private insurance, Medicaid benefits, Supplemental Social Security Income and the account beneficiary's income, as well as any other sources.

Due to the support of grassroots efforts by organizations across the country, the ABLE Act became federal law in December 2014 allowing states to establish an ABLE program. The 109th General Assembly unanimously passed the legislation in 2015, establishing an Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Program in accordance with federal legislation. The Tennessee ABLE Act was sponsored by Senator Becky Duncan Massey (R), of Knoxville in the Senate and by Representatives Steve McManus (R) of Cordova and Kevin Brooks (R) of Cleveland. Governor Haslam signed the legislation into law on May 18, 2015, giving the Tennessee Treasury Department permission to establish an ABLE program in Tennessee. The program will go live on June 13, 2016.  To learn more about ABLE TN visit the website at www.abletn.gov.

National Center for Education Statistics - new resource

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, during the 2011-12 academic year, 11.1% of undergraduates reported having a disability. While these students may face unique challenges, they are entitled to the same quality of education as all students. For this reason, the team of experts at BestColleges.com published a guide for students with disabilities outlining their legal rights, where to find assistance on campus, and an extensive list of websites, apps and software resources designed for students' specific needs.

You can review College Resources for Students with Disabilities here: http://www.bestcolleges.com/resources/disabled-students/

New Resources from The Children's Bureau 

Work in child welfare? It's National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and there are plenty of FREE tools to help! See the Outreach Materials, 21 tip sheets, updated activity calendars, and four new "Protective Factors in Practice" interactive scenarios to support and educate families.
https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/preventing/preventionmonth/

New Guide from US Department of Education on undocumented immigrant students Released 

The U.S. Department of Education has released the first in a set of resource guides designed to help school officials support undocumented immigrant students.
The 63-page guide aims to clarify the legal rights of undocumented high school and college students, share resources about federal and private financial aid available to them, and discuss how to support youth applying for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) consideration or renewal. The DACA program allows students who came to the United States as children to apply for relief from deportation.
You can access the guide at:
http://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/focus/supporting-undocumented-youth.pdf

Effective July 1, 2015 the Tennessee Family Support Program will begin an open enrollment for eligible families. The Family Support Program general purpose is defined as followed:

The primary purpose of the program is to support
• Families who have school-aged or younger children with severe disabilities
• Adults with severe disabilities who choose to live with their families
• Adults with severe disabilities not supported by other residential programs funded by state or federal funds
Services can include but are not limited to: Respite care, day care services, home modifications, equipment, supplies, personal assistance, transportation, homemaker services, housing costs, health-related needs, nursing and counseling.

Current participants receiving funds, as well as individuals on the wait list or new applicants must reapply annually. With this new procedure the door is now open for all eligible families to receive assistance. If you know families who might be eligible or are currently receiving services please ask them to contact the Shelby County Administrator for the Family Support Program. Funds will be distributed on a first come basis once all documents are received and eligibility met. I have attached the guidelines if you need additional reference.. Families may call the numbers listed for applications and more information.

Shelby Residential and Vocational Services, Inc. 3971 Knight Arnold:

Pacely Cooper (901) 869-9285 (Pacely.cooper@srvs.org)
Michelle Harris (901) 312-9911 (michelle.harris@srvs.org)
Latisha Reynolds (901) 312-6850 (latisha.reynolds@srvs.org)
Tonya Sevion (901) 312-0430 (tonya.sevion@srvs.org)
Troy Allen (troy.allen@srvs.org)
Counties Served: Fayette and Shelby
www.srvs.org

 View Guidelines

Health Care Professionals Survey

Part of the Boling Center's mission is to provide continuing education to healthcare professionals in the field. Currently, BCDD is an approved provider to several disciplines however, in an effort to provide the best possible service to our community we are asking professionals to participate in this anonymous survey about your Professional Continuing Education needs.

The survey should take only a few minutes, is completely anonymous and will only be used for program level decision making at the Boling Center to assess customer service. If you have questions, please contact Elizabeth Bishop at 901-448-3127 or email at ebishop@uthsc.edu.

  • Healthcare Professionals Survey

Now available FREE ADHD Resources for Parents and Teachers

The Boling Center Library located at 711 Jefferson Ave, has received an overflow of ADHD resources from the Assisi Foundation. These resources include guides for parents of young children and teens as well as teachers. To request these materials, please contact the Dissemination Coordinator by email to schedule a time to visit the library. These materials are free while supplies last.

GEMS Tea Party 

June 25, 2016 Memphis, TN (Commerical Appeal Article)

The second annual G.E.M.S. Tea Party at the Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities was held on Saturday. The Shelby County Relative Caregiver Program at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center hosted the event for girls 12-17 enrolled in a mentoring group sponsored by the program. The Relative Caregiver Program is a collaboration with the Boling Center for Development Disabilities at UTHSC and the Tennessee Department of Children's Services. It was developed as a means to support children and teens who are being raised by their relatives because their parents are unable to do so. Founded in 2014, Girls Empowered and Mentored for Success (G.E.M.S.) educates and inspires girls through social activities and workshops. The program has grown from 17 girls in 2015 to 24 girls this year. (Yalonda M. James/The Commercial Appeal)Walmart Foundation Grant to AUCD Expands

Nutrition Efforts for People with Disabilities in Four States

SILVER SPRING, MD

The Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) is pleased to announce that the Walmart Foundation has granted AUCD and four of its member Centers $300,000 to launch the "Nutrition is for Everyone" project. This one-year pilot project will provide nutrition education for an estimated 20,000 people in the disability community across Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Tennessee.
Based on public health data, four states were identified as areas where people with disabilities are least likely to be consuming fruits and vegetables and therefore in the most need for nutrition education and support. The "Nutrition is for Everyone" program design employs " Nutrition Ambassadors," trained experts from the AUCD network and local community who will help people with disabilities, as well as their families and friends, develop the knowledge and skills necessary to make healthy decisions about their nutrition needs.
"We are thrilled that AUCD was selected for this collaborative funding that benefits the field," said Andrew Imparato, executive director of AUCD. "We are excited about the Walmart Foundation's commitment to funding programs that provide nutrition education to underserved communities. This grant will support AUCD's direct training of people with disabilities and community members on nutrition, and we expect it to have a positive impact on the health of people with disabilities living in the target states."

The network Centers collaborating on this effort will receive over $190,000 in combined funding to facilitate the program, in which they will competitively select a state "Nutrition Ambassador." Ambassadors will develop a tailored work plan based on their state's specific needs. Ambassadors will provide training for community members with disabilities and their friends and families, to increase the number of people with disabilities receiving nutrition education and subsequently increase the rates of consumption of fruits and vegetables for people with disabilities.
Nutrition and disability experts from the Institute on Disability and Human Development, AUCD's member Center at the University of Illinois in Chicago, will serve as consultant advisors, sharing lessons learned from "Health Matters," a program that builds capacity for organizations across the country to implement health promotion programs for people with developmental disabilities.
The four AUCD members working on this pilot program are in regions with greatest need. These include:

1. Partners for Inclusive Communities at the University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR
Since 1994, Partners for Inclusive Communities (Partners) has trained students to support people with disabilities and their families. Partners has graduated 74 nutrition students with 20 of those receiving more than 300 hours of training. Graduates have gone on to become credentialed as Registered Dietitians and Nutritionists.
"Obesity is a huge problem for our country and Arkansas has the highest rates in the nation. Individuals with disabilities have even higher rates of obesity than the general public. This project will allow us to improve the health of persons with disability in our state. We're excited about the opportunities this provides us. We appreciate Walmart's commitment to the health of people with disabilities," says Dr. David Deere, Director of Partners for Inclusive Communities, Arkansas's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD).
2. Human Development Center at Louisiana State University, New Orleans, LA
Many projects at the Human Development Center focus on supporting the education and health of people with disabilities, as well as children and families from diverse and under-served populations. Current nutrition education and health literacy projects include the Early Head Start- Child Care Partnership, a federally funded collaboration with the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center to promote better nutrition and food safety in a cost-efficient, culturally sensitive manner.
"We look forward to extending our nutrition training efforts into different regions of the state through this Nutrition Ambassador model," says Dr. Philip Wilson, director of the Human Development Center, Louisiana's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD).
3. Center for Learning and Leadership at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK
The Center for Learning and Leadership is located in the College of Medicine at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. The community relationships developed by this Center demonstrate a strong commitment to supporting self-advocates as they build capacity in their communities and enact systems change. The Center will draw on the research and guidance of academic associates at the College of Allied Health, as well as current research at the Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Lab.

"We are excited to work on a project that aims to change the trajectory of health for people with disabilities and their families in our state for the better," says Dr. Valarie Williams, director of the Center for Learning and Leadership, Oklahoma's University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD).
4. Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities (BCDD), University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN
The Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities (BCDD) will leverage its Act Early Ambassador experience with systems change in developmental monitoring to benefit "Nutrition is for Everyone." BCDD is an interdisciplinary program that supports children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families through training, service, applied research, information dissemination, planning, and policy development. BCDD offers inclusive nutrition consultations across the lifespan for people with disabilities.

"The Boling Center is pleased to partner with the Walmart Foundation and members of our national network of university centers to provide statewide nutrition education for persons with disabilities, their families, and the community that supports them," says Dr. Bruce Keisling, BCDD's associate director.
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AUCD is a national, nonprofit network of centers and programs in every state and territory working to advance policy and practice for people living with disabilities and their families. Learn more about AUCD and its Public Health is for Everyone program, which offers resources for public health professionals to create programs that benefit entire communities, including people with disabilities, by visiting www.aucd.org or on Twitter at @AUCDnews.

The ArcTN Quarterly Newsletter - 50th Anniversary Edition

The Arc is the nation's largest and leading organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families with a 60 year history of promoting and protecting the rights of people with I/DD and providing them the opportunity to live full, satisfying and self-determined lives as valued and contributing members of their communities. The recent publication of The Connection PDF icon , the quarterly newsletter is available online and as a pdf and highlights the Employment and Community First (ECF) CHOICES waiver and a message from President John Shouse on the importance of community. The Connection can be accessed at https://www.thearctn.org/.

Department of Justice Office of Public Affairs - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Justice Department Secures Statewide Training for Law Enforcement on Interacting with Persons with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities

Today, the Justice Department announced that, under a settlement agreement with the United States, the state of Tennessee is launching a training program available to all law enforcement personnel in Tennessee on effective interactions with people who have intellectual or developmental disabilities. The training, developed by Tennessee's Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (DIDD), helps law enforcement officers communicate effectively with people who have disabilities and their families in order to improve the safety and effectiveness of those interactions and to enhance community policing efforts. DIDD has posted the training materials on its website and will present the materials at a statewide conference of law enforcement training officers later this month.
DIDD developed the training as part of a court-approved exit plan that resolves long running litigation between the United States and Tennessee concerning care for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The lawsuit will continue during DIDD's performance of other exit plan provisions.
"We applaud the state's efforts to ensure that law enforcement officers engage safely and effectively with people who have intellectual or developmental disabilities and their families," said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta of the Civil Rights Division. "This initiative is good for those people, for officers who serve in communities across the state, and for effective law enforcement. Tennessee joins a new national trend in recognizing and preparing for the intersection between law enforcement and people with disabilities. We also recognize and appreciate the continued collaboration of important stakeholders in reaching agreement on this crucial training, including DIDD, People First of Tennessee and the Parent Guardian Associations of Clover Bottom and Greene Valley Developmental Centers."
The United States brought suit against the state of Tennessee in 1996, concerning conditions of care and the right to care in integrated settings for residents of Clover Bottom Developmental Center, Greene Valley Developmental Center and Nat T. Winston Center. The state and the United States, along with two interveners, settled the case in 1996 through an agreement that called for both improved conditions within the centers and the integration of residents into community settings. Shortly after the initiation of the suit, the state closed Nat T. Winston Center. The state is now closing Clover Bottom Center and Greene Valley Developmental Centers. In 2015, the court approved an exit plan designed to resolve the litigation by bringing to fruition planned community improvements in respite care, individual support planning and other areas. The exit plan also required that the state develop the law enforcement training discussed above.
For more information on the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, please visit www.justice.gov/crt.

http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/justice-department-secures-statewide-training-law-enforcement-interacting-persons 

 

New Project Findings: Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Somali and Non-Somali Children in Minneapolis

CDC's NCBDDD, in partnership with NIH, Autism Speaks, and AUCD, recently conducted the largest project to date looking at the number and characteristics of Somali children with autism spectrum disorder in any U.S. community. Today, key findings from this project were released.

Early Signs of Autism Video Tutorial

The Kennedy Krieger Institute and Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have published a free online video to improve the recognition of the early signs of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among pediatricians, parents and early intervention providers. Bringing the Early Signs of Autism Spectrum Disorders Into Focus (2013, runtime 9:03 minutes) consists of six video clips that compare toddlers with no signs of ASD to toddlers with early signs of ASD and includes an explanation of how the specific behaviors exhibited by each child are either suggestive of ASD or typical child development.
Early Recognition of ASD PDF icon

 

Promoting Healthy Weight 2.0 - September 30, 2016

The University of Tennessee Department of Nutrition at the Knoxville campus would like to invite community professionals to the next Promoting Healthy Weight Colloquium: Children and Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs.

One of the featured speakers will be Linda Bandini, PhD, RD from Boston University. 
Dr. Bandini's research focuses on health promotion, dietary intake and physical activity in children with developmental disabilities.

Please save the date for September 30, 2016. There will be onsite and webcast viewing available for those who wish to participate. Additionally, we will be applying for CEUs for this event, so be sure to mark your calendars!

Don't forget to add utphn@utk.edu to your address book so that our emails will arrive in your inbox!

If you are interested in viewing the Spring 2016 Promoting Healthy Weight 2.0 presentations on Early Childhood, the archive and slides are now available on our website.

Presenter presentations and instructions to view the archived colloquia are available at http://nutrition.utk.edu/httpnutrition-utk-edupromoting-healthy-weight-colloquium-series-2-0-overviewarchived-webcasts/.

Sincerely,

Promoting Healthy Weight 2.0 Planning Team
The University of Tennessee
Department of Nutrition
utphn@utk.edu

2017 Mid South Autism Conference - Call for Proposals Now Open

The Mid South Autism Conference (MAC) is back in 2017 with an exciting line up of keynote speakers and a new location.  MAC will be held at the Guesthouse at Graceland in Memphis, TN.  A call for presentations is currently open as well as vendor booths.  Learn more the Conference website

Restraint and Seclusion

The Disability Coalition on Education (DCE) has created a information sheet on Restraint and SeclusionLink to Acrobat file

IDD Toolkit Featured on Government Disability Blog

Janet Shouse with the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center is featured as a guest blogger on Disability.blog, describing  the collaborative development of the IDD E-Toolkit.

Fact Sheets on Medicaid In Tennessee and Family Support

Three new fact sheets have been developed by The Arc of Tennessee (see list below). For more information or to obtain copies contact The Arc of Tennessee at 615-248-5878 or visit the website atwww.thearctn.org.

New materials available on the Learn the Signs: Act Early website

Visit www.cdc.gov/actearly to find two new materials. Track Your Child's Developmental Milestonesbrochure (English and Spanish versions) and the Milestone Moments booklet. Only the English version of the booklet is available; the Spanish version will be posted soon. Links to both PDFs are below

Milestones Moments Booklet  milestones image

Milestones Brochure: Track Your Child’s Developmental Milestones
English  index clip image | Spanish  image clip )

Parents Guide to New State Rules: Restraint and Seclusion

To provide parents with information regarding Tennessee's state rules on restraint and seclusion in schools, the Disability Coalition on Education has developed a fact sheet. This fact sheet is available from the DCE at no cost. For additional copies or information regarding this topic contact Holly Lu Conant Rees at hlu1055@comcast.net. Click to view a fact sheet in spanish.

New Disability Website

The U.S. Department of Labor has launched Disability.gov, a redesigned federal Web site that connects the more than 50 million Americans with disabilities to thousands of disability-related resources.The site is also for parents of children with disabilities, employers, workforce and human resource professionals, veterans, educators, caregivers, and many others.

Contact BCDD

711 Jefferson Avenue
Memphis, Tennessee 38105
Map
Phone: 901-448-6511
Toll-free:888-572-2249
TDD:901-448-4677
Fax: 901-448-7097